Wherever I am, the world comes after me.
It offers me its busyness. It does not believe that I do not want it.
Now I understand 
why the old poets of China went so far
and high 
into the mountains, then crept into the pale mist.
"The Old Poets of China" by Mary Oliver

The Asian Center Blog

The Asian Center Blog, provisionally titled such, features the following content, including but not limited to: excerpts of reviews of books, essays, films, and other Asia-related media from third-party websites; reviews of such content from Asian Center staff or faculty; announcements of Asian Studies conferences, etc. 

Please note that by posting third-party content, the UP Asian Center does not necessarily entail an endorsement of, or agreement with (or otherwise) said content and/or its creators, organizers, publishers, and the like. Neither are the views expressed in such content necessarily a representation of the views of the UP Asian Center or its faculty or staff. They are featured here as Asian Studies-related material and are posted solely for information-dissemination purposes. 


 

Popular imagination pegs the Kama Sutra primarily as a sex manual; certainly it is, but there’s more to it than that, as James McConnachie shows in The Book of Love: The Story of the Kamasutra, published by Metropolitan Books in 2008.